Corporal Steve Martin

posted Dec 19, 2010, 7:24 AM by CDNSOLDIER.COM Administrator   [ updated Dec 19, 2010, 7:27 AM ]

One Canadian Forces member was killed yesterday, December 18th, 2010, after an improvised explosive device detonated while on operations in the Panjwa’i district of Kandahar Province, at approximately 12:30 p.m. local time.  

Killed in action was Corporal Steve Martin, from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, serving with 1st Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment Battle Group, based at CFB Valcartier, Quebec.

Our thoughts are with the families and friends of our fallen soldier during this difficult time. We will not forget the sacrifice of this soldier as we continue to bring security and hope to the people of Kandahar Province.

Canada in partnership with Afghan National Security Forces, the Afghan authorities and ISAF partners remain committed to providing Afghans the necessary support to build a self-sustained society improving the security situation in order to set confidence-building conditions for reconstruction and development in the region. 

Corporal Brian Pinksen

posted Aug 30, 2010, 1:35 PM by CDNSOLDIER.COM Administrator   [ updated Aug 30, 2010, 1:38 PM ]

A Canadian soldier, who sustained injuries in Afghanistan, passed away at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany today. 

Corporal (Cpl) Brian Pinksen from 2nd Battalion, The Royal Newfoundland Regiment, based in Corner Brook Newfoundland, was serving in Afghanistan with the 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment Battle Group. Cpl Pinksen sustained his injuries when an improvised explosive device (IED) detonated during a routine patrol in the Panjwa’i District, southwest of Kandahar City at approximately 1:40 p.m., Kandahar time on 22 Aug, 2010.

Cpl Pinksen was treated on scene and evacuated by helicopter to the Role 3 Multi-National Medical Facility at Kandahar Airfield then subsequently moved to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Centre in Germany.  He arrived in Ramstein, Germany on 25 August and succumbed to his injuries earlier today at the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center.

Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of our fallen comrade during this very difficult time. We will not forget Cpl Pinksen’s sacrifice as we continue to bring security and hope to the people of Kandahar Province.

Canada in partnership with the government of Afghanistan, the Afghan National Security Forces and ISAF remain committed to improving the security situation in order to set the conditions for reconstruction and development in the region. Joint Task Force Afghanistan, continues to be fully engaged in an initiative that serves to gradually enhance security, to strengthen governance and to expand the government’s authority in key areas of Kandahar Province.

Captain Robert Semrau Not Guilty of Murder

posted Jul 20, 2010, 7:28 PM by CDNSOLDIER.COM Administrator

A military panel comprised of four Canadian Forces (CF) members has found Captain Robert Semrau guilty of disgraceful conduct in the shooting death of a wounded insurgent that occurred in Afghanistan in October 2008.

In summary, the military panel reached the following verdict:

Not guilty: Charge of Second-degree murder, contrary to Section 130 of the National Defence Act, pursuant to Section 235(1) of the Criminal Code;

Not guilty: Charge of Attempting to commit murder with a firearm (alternative to the Charge of Second Degree Murder) - contrary to Section 130 of the National Defence Act, pursuant to Section 239(1)(a.1) of the Criminal Code;

Guilty: Charge of Behaving in a disgraceful manner – contrary to Section 93 of the National Defence Act; and

Not guilty: Charge of Negligent performance of a military duty - contrary to Section 124 of the National Defence Act.

The sentence will be determined at a later date.

Captain Semrau was arrested on December 31, 2008, by the Canadian Forces National Investigation Service and charged with second-degree murder while deployed in Afghanistan as Commander of an Operational Mentor Liaison Team. Captain Semrau was released from custody with conditions on January 7, 2009. On September 17, 2009 three additional charges were brought forward to Court Martial, which began on January 25, 2010 at the Asticou Center in Gatineau, Québec.

Sapper Brian Collier

posted Jul 20, 2010, 7:21 PM by CDNSOLDIER.COM Administrator   [ updated Jul 20, 2010, 7:23 PM ]

One Canadian soldier was killed after an improvised explosive device detonated during a foot patrol in the Panjwa’i District, about 15 kilometres southwest of Kandahar City, at approximately 9:00 a.m. Kandahar time on 20 July 2010.

Killed in action was Sapper Brian Collier from 1 Combat Engineer Regiment, based in Edmonton, Alberta. Sapper Collier was serving with 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment Battle Group.

We are all thinking of the family and friends of our Canadian fallen comrade during this sad time. We will not forget Sapper Collier’s sacrifice as we continue to bring security and hope to the people of Kandahar Province.

Canada in partnership with the government of Afghanistan, the Afghan National Security Forces and ISAF remain committed to improving the security situation in order to set the conditions for reconstruction and development in the region. Joint Task Force Afghanistan, continues to be fully engaged in an initiative that serves to gradually enhance security, to strengthen governance and to expand the government’s authority in key areas of Kandahar Province.

Sergeant James Patrick Macneil

posted Jun 21, 2010, 6:09 PM by CDNSOLDIER.COM Administrator   [ updated Jun 21, 2010, 6:12 PM ]

One Canadian soldier was killed after an improvised explosive device detonated during a foot patrol, about 20 kilometres southwest of Kandahar City, in the Panjwa’i District, at approximately 8:00 a.m. Kandahar time on 21 June 2010.

Killed in action was Sergeant James Patrick Macneil from 2 Combat Engineer Regiment, based in Petawawa, Ontario. Sergeant Macneil was serving with 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment Battle Group.

We are all thinking of the family and friends of our Canadian fallen comrade during this sad time. The commitment and sacrifice of our military and their loved ones are helping to make a difference in the lives of the people of Kandahar Province.

Canada in partnership with Afghan National Security Forces, the Afghan government and ISAF remain committed to improving the security situation in order to set the conditions for reconstruction and development in the region. Together, Afghan National Security Forces and Joint Task Force Afghanistan continue to maintain the initiative in Kandahar Province.

Twelve Canadian Soldiers Charged with Drug Trafficking

posted Jun 16, 2010, 3:00 PM by CDNSOLDIER.COM Administrator   [ updated Jun 16, 2010, 3:04 PM ]

The Canadian Forces National Investigation Service (CFNIS) the investigative arm of the Canadian Forces Military Police, yesterday charged the following nine current Canadian Forces (CF) members from Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Wainwright with several drug-related offences:
  • Corporal Thomas MacDougall;
  • Private Jeffrey Brennan;
  • Private Benjamin Humphrey;
  • Private Dominique Malette;
  • Private Glen Morgan;
  • Private Michael Polack;
  • Private Claude Roger Rocan;
  • Private Clayton Taylor; and
  • Private Matthew Wright;

The following former CF members, who have recently released, have also been charged:

  • Ex-Private Michael Masserey;
  • Ex-Private David McKinnell; and
  • Ex-Private Melyssa Lake (previously charged on May 19, 2010).

Their release was scheduled prior to the investigation, and CF members can be charged for offences up to two years following their release from service.

The charges were laid after an investigation led by the CFNIS’s National Drug Enforcement Team, with the assistance of the Military Police Detachment at CFB Wainwright, and the RCMP "K" Division Clandestine Lab Enforcement and Response (CLEAR) Team. The RCMP also assisted the investigation with the provision of a police drug detection dog.

The CFNIS charged ex-Private David McKinnell and Private Matthew Wright each with one count of production of a controlled substance contrary to section 130 of the National Defence Act (NDA), pursuant to section 7(2)(c) of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA). The production charges are related to the manufacture of Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a type of hallucinogenic drug. The two individuals were also charged with multiple counts of trafficking and possession of controlled substances, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to sections 5(1) and 4(1) of the CDSA.

The CFNIS also charged ex-Private Michael Masserey and Private Glen Morgan with trafficking of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 5(1) of the CDSA, and multiple counts of possession of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA.

The eight other current and former CF members were charged with possession of a controlled substance contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA, and with controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA. Additional information regarding the specifics of the charges is included in the backgrounder at the link below.

"These charges show the continuous commitment of the Canadian Forces Military Police to ensure a work environment free of drugs for CF personnel,” said Major Daniel Dandurand, Officer Commanding the CFNIS Western Region Detachment.

The files of the accused will now be referred to the Director of Military Prosecutions (DMP) who will decide whether to proceed or not with preferral of charges to court martial.

The CFNIS is an independent Military Police unit with a mandate to investigate serious and sensitive matters in relation to National Defence property, DND employees, and CF personnel serving in Canada and abroad.


DETAILED INFORMATION


The Canadian Forces National Investigation Service (CFNIS), the investigative arm of the Canadian Forces Military Police, has charged twelve members of the Canadian Forces (CF) with drug-related offences at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Wainwright on June 15, 2010.

Investigation process

CFNIS investigations are completed in accordance with Canadian police standards. An investigation includes interviews of all persons of interest, collection of evidence, and analysis of all of the information collected.

The charges were laid after an investigation led by the CFNIS’s National Drug Enforcement Team, with the assistance of the Military Police Detachment at CFB Wainwright, and the RCMP "K" Division Clandestine Lab Enforcement and Response (CLEAR) Team. The RCMP also assisted the investigation with the provision of a police drug detection dog.

Findings

The CFNIS charged twelve former and current CF members with more than 70 offences on June 15, 2010. Following are the detailed charges:

  1. Ex-Private David McKinnell was charged with one count of production of a controlled substance contrary to section 130 of the National Defence Act (NDA), pursuant to section7(2)(c) of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA); two counts of trafficking of a controlled substance contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 5(1) of the CDSA; one count of disobeying a court order, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 127(1) of the Criminal Code of Canada (CCC); one count of pointing a firearm, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 87(1) of the CCC; seven counts of possession of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA; and six counts of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA;
               
  2. Private Matthew Wright was charged with one count of production of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section7(2)(c) of the CDSA; two counts of trafficking of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 5(1) of the CDSA; three counts of possession of a controlled substance contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA; and four counts of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA;
  3. Ex-Private Michael Masserey was charged with two counts of trafficking of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA pursuant to section 5(1) of the CDSA; two counts of possession of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA; one count of failure to comply with conditions, contrary to section 101.1 of the NDA; and three counts of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA;
  4. Private Glen Morgan was charged with one count of trafficking of a controlled substance contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 5(1) of the CDSA; two counts of possession of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA; and two counts of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA;
  5. Private Benjamin Humphrey was charged with five counts of possession of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA; and five counts of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA;
  6. Private Dominique Malette was charged with two counts of possession of a controlled substance contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA; two counts of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA; and two counts of stealing, contrary to section 114 of the NDA;
  7. Ex-Private Melyssa Lake was charged on May 19, 2010, with one count of possession of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA; and three counts of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA;
  8. Private Clayton Taylor was charged with one count of possession of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA; and three counts of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA;
  9. Corporal Thomas MacDougall and Private Michael Polack were charged with one count each of possession of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA; and two counts each of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA;
  10. Private Claude Roger Rocan was charged with one count of possession of a controlled substance, contrary to section 130 of the NDA, pursuant to section 4(1) of the CDSA; and one count of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA; and
  11. Private Jeffrey Brennan was charged with three counts of controlled substance use, contrary to section 129 of the NDA.

Types of drugs involved

The drug production charges are related to the manufacture of dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a type of hallucinogenic drug. This was confirmed by Health Canada following laboratory analysis of samples seized.

The drug trafficking charges are related to ecstasy, cannabis, and some prescription drugs.

The drug possession charges are related to cannabis, ecstasy, DMT, cocaine, and some prescription drugs.

The drug use charges are related to cannabis, ecstasy, DMT, cocaine and some prescription drugs.

Next steps

The files of the accused will now be referred to the Director of Military Prosecutions (DMP) who will decide whether to proceed or not to court martial (preferral of charges).

The Canadian Forces National Investigation Service (CFNIS)

The CFNIS is an independent Military Police unit with a mandate to investigate serious and sensitive matters in relation to National Defence property, Departmental employees, and Canadian Forces personnel serving in Canada and abroad.

The Commanding Officer of the CFNIS reports directly to the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal.
Regardless of the circumstance or environment, the members of the CFNIS remain under his command. This reporting structure allows the CFNIS to conduct thorough investigations in a fair and impartial manner.

Trooper Larry John Zuidema Rudd

posted May 25, 2010, 11:53 AM by CDNSOLDIER.COM Administrator   [ updated May 25, 2010, 11:55 AM ]

One Canadian soldier was killed after an improvised explosive device detonated during a routine security operation, about 20 kilometres southwest of Kandahar City, in the Panjwa’i District, at approximately 12:30 p.m.  Kandahar time on 24 May 2010

Killed in action was Trooper Larry John Zuidema Rudd from the Royal Canadian Dragoons, serving with 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, based in Petawawa, Ontario.

All members of Task Force Kandahar are thinking of the family and friends of the fallen soldier during this difficult time. We will not forget this soldier’s sacrifice as we continue to bring security and hope to the people of Kandahar Province.

Canada in partnership with the Afghan government and ISAF remain committed to improving the security situation in order to set the conditions for reconstruction and development in the region. Together, Afghan National Security Forces and Joint Task Force Afghanistan continue to maintain the initiative in Kandahar Province.

Colonel Geoff Parker

posted May 20, 2010, 8:19 AM by CDNSOLDIER.COM Administrator   [ updated May 20, 2010, 8:20 AM ]

One Canadian Forces member travelling in a NATO convoy was killed after an insurgent detonated a vehicle borne improvised explosive device between the convoy of vehicles in Kabul at approximately 8 a.m. local Afghanistan time on 18 May 2010.

Killed in action was Colonel Geoff Parker from the Royal Canadian Regiment, working at Land Force Central Area Headquarters. At the time of his death, Colonel Parker was in Kabul as part of a NATO team preparing for their upcoming mission.

Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of our fallen Canadian comrade during this sad time. The commitment and sacrifice of our soldiers and their loved ones are helping to make a difference in the lives of the people of Kandahar Province.

Together, Afghan National Security Forces and Joint Task Force Afghanistan continue to maintain the initiative in Kandahar Province. Canada in partnership with the Afghan government and ISAF remain committed to improving the security situation in order to set the conditions for reconstruction and development in the region.

Private Kevin Thomas McKay

posted May 14, 2010, 8:08 AM by CDNSOLDIER.COM Administrator   [ updated May 14, 2010, 8:09 AM ]

One Canadian soldier was killed when an improvised explosive device detonated during a dismounted night patrol in the Panjwayi district, approximately 15 kilometres southwest of Kandahar City, at 8:00 p.m. Kandahar time on May 13, 2010.

Killed in action was Private Kevin Thomas McKay from the 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, based in Edmonton, Alberta. He was serving as a member of the Task Force 3-09 Battle Group.

Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of our fallen Canadian comrade during this sad time.The commitment and sacrifice of our soldiers and their loved ones are helping to make a difference in the lives of the people of Kandahar Province.

Together, Afghan National Security Forces and Joint Task Force Afghanistan continue to maintain the initiative in Kandahar Province. Canada in partnership with the Afghan government and ISAF remain committed to improving the security situation in order to set the conditions for reconstruction and development in the region.

Recruiting and Retention Statistics

posted May 4, 2010, 9:09 PM by CDNSOLDIER.COM Administrator   [ updated May 4, 2010, 9:17 PM ]

The Canadian Forces have released statistics relating to recruiting and retention of members. Below is their report.

Increasing the size and strength of a large organization such as the Canadian Forces (CF) is a significant endeavour, requiring both time and resources. To increase the number of personnel, the CF must not only recruit new people, they must also train these people, and take steps to retain the workforce already in place.

Some CF trades, mostly technical in nature, represent a recruiting challenge in a modern, high-tech economy. CF recruiters are currently focusing their efforts on filling these high-demand trades, so that the CF continue to put the right people to work in the right places at the right time. These more focused efforts will ensure that the CF maintain their effectiveness in meeting the diverse security needs of the nation at home and abroad.

Tables A and B demonstrate the growth of the CF over the last six years. Over that period, the Regular Force and the Primary Reserve have each grown by about 6,500 personnel.

Table A
The Strength of the Regular Force
2004-2010

As of

 

31 Mar 10

68,136

31 Dec 09

67,756

30 Sep 09

66,949

30 June 09

65,751

31 Mar 09

65,890

31 Mar 08

64,397

31 Mar 07

63,716

31 Mar 06

62,703

31 Mar 05

61,460

31 Mar 04

61,394


Regular Force personnel are employed full-time and have usually enrolled for long-term service.

Table B
The Strength of the Reserve Force
2004-2010

 

As of

Reserve Force

Primary Reserve

Cadet
Organizations and Training Services
(COATS)

Canadian Rangers

Supplementary
Reserve

Total

Paid Strength
(approx.)

31 Mar 10

35,301

24,265

9,862

4,295

16,138

31 Dec 09

35,169

24,985

8,079

4,229

19,288

30 Sep 09

35,056

27,243

7,864

4,140

19,290

30 June 09

34,989

23,359

7,729

4,510

21,057

31 Mar 09

34,913

26,293

7,728

4,323

23,401

31 Mar 08

34,616

25,296

7,742

4,244

28,714

31 Mar 07

34,216

25,788

7,479

4,266

27,734

31 Mar 06

32,947

23,237

8,014

4,448

35,312

31 Mar 05

29,786

24,257

7,050

4,179

40,000

31 Mar 04

28,964

23,126

6,764

4,096

35,000


Primary Reserve personnel train regularly and may work alongside their Regular Force counterparts on a full-time basis. There are three “classes” of service in the Primary Reserve: Class A (employed part time in Canada), Class B (employed full time in Canada) and Class C (deployed on operations, domestically or internationally). The existence of these three classes of service means that not all Primary Reserve personnel will be working on any given day – hence the value of the “paid strength” figures provided in Table C.

Other “subcomponents” of the Reserve Force are the Supplementary Reserve(former personnel who could be called out in an emergency), Canadian Rangers (who constitute a military presence in isolated and sparsely settled areas of Canada) and the Cadet Organizations and Training Services, or COATS (officers with administrative, instructional and supervisory responsibilities to the cadet program).

Recruiting

At the end of the Cold War, in the early 1990s, the CF included approximately 89,000 Regular Force personnel. In 1994, the “Defence White Paper” set a Regular Force target strength of 60,000 to be reached by 1999. This target was achieved by the end of the 1990s through the implementation of the Force Reduction Program (FRP), which saw approximately 14,000 military personnel take early release or retirement.1 The effects of the FRP are still being felt across the CF.

In 2006, the federal government committed funding to support the growth of the CF to 68,000 Regular Force personnel and 26,000 Primary Reserve personnel. This decision was made to help sustain international operations in coming years and to support the CF contribution to security at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver. In 2008, the Canada First Defence Strategy provided the additional resources needed to expand the Forces to a sustainable 100,000 (70,000 Regular Force and 30,000 Primary Reserve).

As Table C illustrates, over the last few years, Canadians have responded to the career opportunities being offered by Canada’s military, and the CF have increased in strength.

Table C
Recruiting to the Regular Force
2003-2010

Fiscal Year
(April 1 - March 31)

Recruiting
Goals

Recruiting
Results

2009-10

7,454

7,522

2008-09

7,995

7,701

2007-08

6,865

6,716

2006-07

6,426

6,517

2005-06

5,527

5,644

2004-05

4,622

4,333

2003-04

4,440

4,339


The CF are now approaching the force expansion goals outlined in the Canada First Defence Strategy. This may be attributed to a combination of successful recruiting and stabilized attrition.

Attrition

While the CF have generally met or exceeded their recruiting goals, over the last few years, keeping trained, qualified personnel has proven more difficult. The shortage of qualified workers, especially in technical trades, is a challenge that has been faced by other Canadian employers, and the CF have actively competed to retain the interest of skilled people initially drawn to a military career.

The rate of CF attrition (or departures) rose from approximately 7% in March 2006 to 8% in March 2007, and to 9% in March 2008. As of March 2009, it seemed that the rate had stabilized at 9%. As of March 2010, the rate of attrition had fallen for the first time in four years, to 7.5%. It is felt that a reasonable rate of attrition to support force renewal ranges between 6.5 and 10%.

As Table D illustrates, successful recruiting has historically been offset by the departure of CF personnel from the Regular Force.

Table D
Departures from the Regular Force
2003-2010

Fiscal Year
(April 1 - March 31)

Recruiting
Results

Departures
(Attrition)

Overall
Growth

2009-10

7,522

5,293

+2,229

2008-09

7,701

6,217

+1,484

2007-08

6,716

6,088

+628

2006-07

6,517

5,514

+1,003

2005-06

5,644

4,402

+1,242

2004-05

4,333

4,265

+68

2003-04

4,339

3,933

+406

Most CF personnel who leave the CF do so before the end of the first year of service, or once they have become eligible for a military pension (normally, after 25 years of service).

When CF personnel leave early in their career, their reasons include the requirement to maintain high physical fitness standards, personal and family issues, and dissatisfaction with their chosen military occupation.

In terms of late-career attrition, the CF have been experiencing a surge in the number of personnel who have become entitled to a military pension that is comparable to the increased numbers of “Baby Boomers” retiring from Canadian public and private sector jobs.

Retention

Under a far-ranging retention strategy, the CF have been exploring ways of reducing voluntary releases during the early stages of a military career. Ideally, recruits would enter the CF with more realistic early-career expectations, experience a smoother transition into the military lifestyle and successfully address physical fitness training requirements. Recruits who regretted their original choice of occupation would have the option of transferring to a new occupation within the CF. Improved medical support would return injured recruits to training more quickly.

The CF have also been finding ways of retaining personnel at a later stage in their career. Initiatives under consideration include better career management, and greater support of CF families – such as improved deployment, reunion and relocation programs, expanded child care, enhanced mental health care and better alignment of CF and Veterans Affairs Canada services.

The CF have changed the compulsory retirement age from 55 to 60 to allow for longer service and to permit those who join later in life to gain access to full pension benefits.

Looking Ahead

The CF continue to meet challenges related to the recruiting and retention of military personnel, and the placement of those personnel in certain high-demand trades. Since 2005, the CF have benefited from a renewed commitment from the federal government, and significant increases in funding to fix, grow and transform Canada’s military. Most recently, this has resulted in the approval of the Canada First Defence Strategy, which will allow the CF to grow and strengthen over the next decade with a degree of certainty and coordination that was not previously possible.

Under the CFDS, the CF will expand to a sustainable 100,000 (70,000 Regular Force and 30,000 Primary Reserve) by fiscal year 2027-28. Canada’s military has an expansion plan in place, and the resources to grow, to modernize and to enhance its ability to react to any security challenges the future may bring.

1Report from Chief Review Services: “Audit of Force Reduction Program”

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